tokoyami no sumeragi.

2,226 notes

We keep coming back to the question of representation because identity is always about representation. People forget that when they wanted white women to get into the workforce because of the world war, what did they start doing? They started having a lot of commercials, a lot of movies, a lot of things that were redoing the female image, saying, ‘Hey, you can work for the war, but you can still be feminine.’ So what we see is that the mass media, film, TV, all of these things, are powerful vehicles for maintaining the kinds of systems of domination we live under, imperialism, racism, sexism etc. Often there’s a denial of this and art is presented as politically neutral, as though it is not shaped by a reality of domination.

— bell hooks (Reel To Real: Race, Sex, and Class at the Movies)

(Source: theoceanwithin, via ethiopienne)

Filed under bell hooks representation

8,980 notes

loriadorable:

the-exercist:

"Passing the Bechdel Test"
Songs that  1. Include at least one female vocalist 2. Who sings to another woman (or implied female audience) 3. About something besides a man

Girl on Fire - Alicia Keys feat. Nicki Minaj // Pop Goes the World - Gossip // Electric Lady - Janelle Monae // I Was an Island - Alicia Weiss // I Wanna Dance With Somebody - Glee Cover // Let Me Blow Ya Mind - Eve feat. Gwen Stefani // Rosie - Daisy Dares You // Me Against the Music - Britney Spears feat. Madonna // Take Me or Leave Me - Rent // You’re the Reason - Victoria Justice // Trouble - Neon Jungle // I Know, I Know, I Know - Tegan and Sara // Raise Your Glass - P!nk // Baddy Girl - M.I.A. // Women’s Suffrage (Bad Romance Parody) - Soomo Publishing // Hollywood - Marina and the Diamonds // Rebel Girl - Bikini Kill // Crazy - Au Reservoir Simone // For Good - Wicked // October Song - Amy Winehouse // Girlfriend - Icona Pop // Q.U.E.E.N. - Janelle Monae // Smile - Vitamin C // Fireball - Willow Smith feat. Nicki Minaj // When’s She Coming Home - The Ditty Bops

Total time = 1 hour 31 minutes
Click here to visit 8tracks and hear the mix. 

Oh shit this is brilliant

loriadorable:

the-exercist:

"Passing the Bechdel Test"

Songs that  1. Include at least one female vocalist 2. Who sings to another woman (or implied female audience) 3. About something besides a man

Girl on Fire - Alicia Keys feat. Nicki Minaj // Pop Goes the World - Gossip // Electric Lady - Janelle Monae // I Was an Island - Alicia Weiss // I Wanna Dance With Somebody - Glee Cover // Let Me Blow Ya Mind - Eve feat. Gwen Stefani // Rosie - Daisy Dares You // Me Against the Music - Britney Spears feat. Madonna // Take Me or Leave Me - Rent // You’re the Reason - Victoria Justice // Trouble - Neon Jungle // I Know, I Know, I Know - Tegan and Sara // Raise Your Glass - P!nk // Baddy Girl - M.I.A. // Women’s Suffrage (Bad Romance Parody) - Soomo Publishing // Hollywood - Marina and the Diamonds // Rebel Girl - Bikini Kill // Crazy - Au Reservoir Simone // For Good - Wicked // October Song - Amy Winehouse // Girlfriend - Icona Pop // Q.U.E.E.N. - Janelle Monae // Smile - Vitamin C // Fireball - Willow Smith feat. Nicki Minaj // When’s She Coming Home - The Ditty Bops

Total time = 1 hour 31 minutes

Click here to visit 8tracks and hear the mix. 

Oh shit this is brilliant

(via onyxmoonstone)

13 notes

So, surprise—she was human. The inverse parabola that Reborn traces—the high of her sexual initiation, the low of her marriage, and her eventual reawakening (her real rebirth)—constitutes a gay-liberation paradigm so obvious it borders on the banal. Except that, as we all know, the story didn’t end so crisply. Sontag came no further out of the closet before the wider public until she was forced to by a pair of hostile biographers in 2000. There’s been endless speculation as to why she remained so tight-lipped. A lot of people have called her a coward.

I don’t think there was anything cowardly about her, though. It was more complicated than that. Her sexuality wasn’t what she wanted the conversation to be about—and she always thought she could control the conversation.

Sapphic Signals

Craig Segliman

Book Forum

(via susan-sontag)

(via scenicroutes)

Filed under susan sontag

11,591 notes

cakeandrevolution:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”
And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)
tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Most linguistic pedantry is inherently racist in nature.

cakeandrevolution:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”

And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)

tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Most linguistic pedantry is inherently racist in nature.

(via thisiswhiteprivilege)

Filed under linguistics racism grammar pedantry